Global Spending on IT Initiatives to Rise Higher Than Expected in 2013

Global Spending on IT Initiatives to Rise Higher Than Expected in 2013

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The latest Gartner Worldwide IT Forecast has just been released for the second quarter of 2013, and news is overall positive for the IT sector of the economy. Global IT spending is now expected to rise to $3.8 trillion this year, a 4.1 percent increase from the 3.6 trillion spent on IT in 2012. According to the managing vice president of Gartner, Richard Gordon, the shock of recent economic developments is expected to be short-lived, causing brief pauses in discretionary spending, yet not stopping the overall growth of the market sector.

Spending on devices is one of the most complicated trends in predicting global IT spending. Spending on desktop computers (PCs) remains flat, while there is a gradual decline in spending on printing devices. However, the market for devices is expected to be higher this year than in 2012, due to the sharp upward trend in spending on premium mobile devices, such as smartphones. The devices sector of the IT market should reach $718 billion in 2013, 7.9 percent higher than in 2012.

Spending on data center systems is now expected to rise 3.7 percent, which is .7 percent less than Gartner’s previous forecast. The lower than expected spending in this market is blamed on short-term declines in spending for external devices, combined with the troubling economic news coming from the EMEA region. This region is comprised of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, where political and social unrest is widespread and the economic future remains uncertain.

Still, the news for the IT industry is overall positive, with companies expected to soon loosen their pocketbooks and once again begin investing large sums on IT initiatives, including new, high-tech devices, data center upgrades, and other technological initiatives. Companies with solid financial footing are willing to invest in technologies to drive them into the new age of information.

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