U.S. Manufacturing Revives in Cities Across the Country

Image via Flickr by eutrophication&hypoxia

Outside of Detroit and Chicago, economists are citing a second chance for new manufacturing hubs, as well as revivals of long-standing manufacturing micro economies that have slowed in recent years. Recovery persists for the U.S. job market as New York shows signs of life for manufacturing. A 2013 yearend report shows 76,300 manufacturing jobs New York City.Although this news is far from a flat line for U.S. manufacturing, analysts are reluctant to cite growth, noting that the industry isn’t growing at the rate of other New York City job sectors.

As New York City’s pulse quickens, other areas of U.S. manufacturing follow suit in this so-called walk of the dead. In addition to the stimulus funds previously promised by President Obama for Detroit and Chicago manufacturing hubs, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo. started a push for a $600 million fund to help increase and support the manufacturing hubs in Missouri.

The senator and economists hope the funds will attract enterprises and start-ups alike. Unlike New York City, the number of Missouri manufacturing jobs has steadily declined over the last decade. Critics are reluctant to believe the new bill and subsequent fund would create enough jobs to significantly impact Missouri’s economy.

Early this month, President Obama campaigned for similar bills to be passed throughout the country. The tour coincided with his efforts to pump new blood back into the veins of U.S. transportation main lines. The race to fund U.S. manufacturing and transportation is not unfounded. Like Missouri, many states across the country experienced an economic decline with thousands of jobs lost in the manufacturing sector alone, reducing the industrial economy by one-third.

President Obama would need congress’ backing to produce the additional necessary funds for a nationwide manufacturing incentive. Detroit and Chicago stimulus impact should be a key indicator for a bipartisan push to pass similar bills in the future.

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